April 18, 2024

Who doesn’t love the experience of traveling on the open road? But driving on some of the roads in America can turn a fun road trip into an irritating and sometimes dangerous experience. Roads are sometimes filled with potholes, while others have unrepaired outdated bridges, and of course, some are an endless construction zone. Whether you love traveling or commuting to work daily, knowing which states have the worst roads is helpful when planning your trip to avoid stress. Let’s examine which states made the worst roads in America list and what factors contributed to these challenging driving conditions.

1. Rhode Island

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

With most Rhode Island residents living close to the coastline, it is no wonder that Rhode Islanders struggle with the state’s poor road conditions. Many blame sea rise and harsh winter weather for 41% of poor urban roads, but the small $537 million spent on yearly road improvements for such a small state might also be a contributing factor.

2. Hawaii

Hawaii
Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Due to its tourism, Hawaii has the second-worst roads in the country, with 17% of rural roads rated poor and 26% of urban roads in bad condition. With a small road improvement budget of $560 million spent and the wear and tear from tourism, it’s no surprise that Hawaii residents face potholes and challenging driving conditions.

3. California

California
Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Despite having spent $14.9 billion in yearly road improvements, California ranks third for having some of the worst roads in the country. With its miles of coastline, the most traveled roads in the U.S., and varied climates, it is easy to see why California’s roads experience intense wear and tear.

4. Louisiana

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

With 25% of Louisiana’s urban roads rated in poor condition and 1.71 fatalities per 100 million miles driven, it’s clear that the state needs to invest more in road maintenance and safety. Despite the $1.5 billion spent on road improvements annually, flooding and hurricanes add to the cost, making it challenging to keep up with repairs.

5. Wisconsin

Wisconsin
Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Wisconsin comes in fifth, which could be partly due to its extremely harsh winters, with freezing temperatures, ice, snow, and salt trucks constantly on the roads. The yearly spending on fixing roads totals $3.9 billion, but bad weather causes potholes and cracks, leaving 28% of city roads in bad shape, while only 6% of rural roads get a poor rating.

6. New York

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

New York is sixth in worst roads in the U.S., with $12 billion spent on road improvements yearly, leaving roads with pots and cracks and 30 % of urban roads in poor condition. With a total infrastructure budget of $24 billion, residents might wonder where all their tax dollars go.

7. Massachusetts

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

With 33% of its urban roads in poor condition, Massachusetts residents face plenty of potholes and cracks when driving the rocky coastline roads. The state spends $3 billion annually on road repairs, but they don’t keep up with the wear and tear from heavy traffic and weather conditions.

8. Nebraska

Nebraska
Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Nebraska is another state that ranks in the bottom ten, coming in eighth place. It spends a total of $1.6 billion annually on road improvement. As a result, 34% of urban roads in Nebraska are in poor condition, but only 4 % of the 3,000 miles of rural roads are considered inadequate.

9. Arkansas

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Even though only 15% of urban roads and 6% of rural roads are rated poor in Arkansas, with an average of 1.88 fatalities per 100 million miles driven, it ranks among the top states for traffic-related deaths. Factors contributing to these high fatalities are unsafe driving behaviors, but the state residents still have to deal with potholes and road debris.

10. Illinois

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

With $6 billion spent on road improvements, Illinois still has 20% of its urban roads rated as poor. Illinois recently did significant repairs to I-255, but they still came in at tenth place nationwide.

11. New Jersey

New Jersey
Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Despite being one of the smallest states, New Jersey ranks high on this list due to its aging infrastructure. With nearly 27% of urban roads and 5% of rural roads rated as poor, drivers in New Jersey have to navigate through potholes and cracks on a daily basis.

12. Washington

Olympic National Park, Washington
Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Washington state has made efforts to improve its road conditions, but with 23 % of urban roads and 5% of rural roads rated as poor, there is still a lot of work to do. Even with the poor urban road conditions, Washington spent $5 billion on road improvements.

13. New Mexico

Albuquerque, New Mexico
Image Credit: Shutterstock.

New Mexico may have the smallest percentage of urban roads rated as poor at 14%, but it has 1.168 fatalities per 100 million miles driven. Maintaining and repairing all of the roads in New Mexico is a massive challenge due to its large area.

14. Colorado

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Colorado may have some of the most scenic roads in the country, but 18% of its urban roads and 5% of its rural roads have poor road conditions. This leads to an average of 1.28 fatalities per 100 million miles driven.

15. West Virginia

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

West Virginia may have one of the lowest percentages of rural roads rated as poor at only 7%, but it has a higher percentage of urban roads rated as poor at 12%. This could be due to the state’s challenging mountainous terrain, making road maintenance and repairs more difficult and costly.

16. Iowa

Iowa
Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Residents of Iowa face rough roads due to harsh winter conditions, which cause wear and tear. Despite this, Iowa still has 20% of urban roads and 6% of rural roads rated poor, with 1.13 fatalities per 100 million miles driven.

17. Texas

Texas
Image Credit: Shutterstock.

As a large state in terms of land area, Texas has a greater need for road maintenance and repairs. With 19% of urban roads and 2% of rural roads rated as poor, Texas sees an average of 1.49 fatalities per 100 million miles driven.

18. Pennsylvania

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Pennsylvania has a mix of urban and rural roads, contributing to its 21% urban poor road rating. Despite this, the state has made efforts to improve road safety, with an average of 1.28 fatalities per 100 million miles driven, and only 3% of rural roads have a poor rating.

19. Mississippi

Mississippi
Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Ranking 19th, Mississippi may have a smaller land area than other states, but it still has many poor roads, with 15% of urban roads and 3% of rural roads rated as poor. Mississippi experiences an average of 1.9 fatalities per 100 million miles driven and spends $1.7 billion annually on road improvements.

20. Alaska

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Despite having a lower population, Alaska still has its fair share of road safety issues, with an average of 1.21 fatalities per 100 million miles driven. With many rural roads, 16% of rural roads rate as poor, and only 9% of urban roads have a poor rating.

21. Michigan

Michigan
Image Credit: Shutterstock.

With lake effects and harsh winter weather, Michigan’s roads take a beating year after year. As a result, Michigan ranks 21st on our list, with 25% of urban roads and 3% of rural roads in poor condition. The state experiences an average of 1.25 fatalities per 100 million miles driven and invests $5.3 billion annually in road improvements.

22. Arizona

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Arizona may boast warmer weather and scenic drives, but it has its fair share of road safety concerns. The state ranks 22nd on our list, averaging 1.6 fatalities per 100 million miles driven. However, only 5% of rural and 12% of urban roads are in poor condition.

23. Oklahoma

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

With its central location and bustling cities, Oklahoma sees a high traffic volume on its roads and 1.55 fatalities per 100 million miles driven. However, the state ranks 23rd on our list, with 6% of rural roads and 17% of urban roads in poor condition.

24. Montana

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Montana may be known for its rugged landscapes and natural beauty, but it also has one of the highest rates of road fatalities. The state ranks 24th on our list, averaging 1.3 fatalities per 100 million miles driven. Twelve percent of urban and two percent of rural roads are in poor condition.

Source: ConsumerAffairs

25 Most Dangerous Roads in the World: Are Your Brave Enough to Tackle These Treacherous Highways?

million dollar highway usa
Image Credit: Shutterstock.

With over 42,000 road traffic accident fatalities in the U.S. in 2022, you can see even with solid safety regulations and good transport infrastructure, there’s plenty of danger on our roads. But across the world, where conditions, poor infrastructure, and location combine, there are some truly treacherous roads.

Best Regions in the U.S. to Escape to When Society Collapses

Alaska skyline
Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Choosing a refuge in the event of societal collapse involves weighing the pros and cons of each location against your personal preparedness goals and abilities. Whether you’re drawn to the solitude of the desert or the protective heights of the mountains, the key is finding a place that offers safety and the opportunity for growth and renewal.

20 Crucial Supplies for Surviving a Societal Collapse

glass of water
Image Credit: Shutterstock.

In the face of uncertainty, being well-prepared gives you at least some degree of control and security. The thought of a societal collapse, while extreme, prompts us to consider how we might endure without the conveniences of our current lifestyle. Here’s a list of 20 essential items that could prove indispensable in such a scenario. This guide isn’t about succumbing to fear but embracing preparedness and resilience.