March 1, 2024

If you need a good, trusty weapon for self-defense, but a gun just isn’t your thing and pepper spray isn’t effective enough, a taser might be the right choice.

flag of Nevada

Tasers occupy a sort of middle ground between these two other options, having more range and better effectiveness compared to pepper spray but not being anywhere near as lethal as a firearm.

More and more civilians are turning to them as an alternate self-defense option, but Tasers are not uniformly legal across the land. How about in Nevada? Are tasers legal in Nevada?

Yes, tasers are completely legal to purchase, possess, and carry openly or concealed in Nevada. You will not need a permit to carry a taser, but you’ve got to be at least 18 to have one.

The easy availability of tasers makes them a highly attractive alternative for some folks, especially considering that you won’t need a concealed weapons permit to pack one. Nonetheless, despite being a highly permissive state when it comes to tasers there are plenty of other laws and regulations you’ll need to know about in Nevada. I’ve got everything you need to know in the rest of this article…

How are Tasers Classified in Nevada?

Tasers have their own specific classification in Nevada, and are defined as “electronic stun devices.” Basically, anything that emits an electrical charge in any way capable of disabling a person temporarily or permanently is an electronic stun device under the state statutes.

Read the exact text of the definition taken from NRS 202.357 below.

NRS 202.357 – Electronic stun device: Use prohibited except for self-defense; possession by certain persons prohibited; sale, gift or other provision to certain persons prohibited; penalties.

9. As used in this section, “electronic stun device” means a device that:

(a) Emits an electrical charge or current that is transmitted by projectile, physical contact or other means; and

(b) Is designed to disable a person or animal temporarily or permanently.

Are Stun Guns Legal in Nevada?

Yes, stun guns are completely legal in Nevada just like tasers. To clarify, Nevada makes no difference legally between stun guns and tasers but the reality is that stun guns and tasers are two different types of weapons. Tasers fire electrodes connected to the launcher by wires, whereas stun guns don’t.

Can You Carry a Taser Openly in Nevada?

Yes, you can. Tasers and stun guns can both be openly carried in Nevada without benefit of a permit so long as you are legally able to possess it. I will also note here that tasers and stun guns are not covered by the same statutes that cover firearms specifically or by definition.

Can You Carry a Taser Concealed in Nevada?

Yes, you sure can. Tasers and stun guns are both legal for concealed carry in Nevada, with no permit necessary. However, you’ve got to be able to legally possess the taser to carry one concealed lawfully.

Are there Age Restrictions on Taser Ownership or Possession in Nevada?

Yes, there is. You have to be at least 18 years old or older to legally possess or carry a taser or stun gun in Nevada. No exceptions, and anyone who furnishes a taser or stun gun to a minor is guilty of a crime.

NRS 202.357(…)

3. A child under 18 years of age shall not have in his or her possession or under his or her custody or control any electronic stun device.

What You Need to Do to Buy a Taser in Nevada

Purchasing a taser or stun gun in Nevada is very straightforward, as they’re freely available for most gun shops, nicely stocked sporting goods stores, and other places.

So long as you’re only purchasing it for self-defense and are not a felon, a fugitive from justice, an illegal alien, and you have not been adjudicated mentally ill or involuntarily committed you can easily get your taser.

Make sure you check out all the details from NRS 202.357 below.

NRS 202.357(…)

1. Except as otherwise provided in this section, a person shall not use an electronic stun device on another person for any purpose other than self-defense.

2. Except as otherwise provided in this section, a person shall not have in his or her possession or under his or her custody or control any electronic stun device if the person:

(a) Has been convicted of a felony in this State or any other state, or in any political subdivision thereof, or of a felony in violation of the laws of the United States of America, unless the person has received a pardon and the pardon does not restrict his or her right to bear arms;

(b) Is a fugitive from justice;

(c) Has been adjudicated as mentally ill or has been committed to any mental health facility; or

(d) Is illegally or unlawfully in the United States.

Is Training Mandatory for Taser Ownership in Nevada?

No. You don’t have to undergo any sort of specialized training in order to purchase, possess, or carry a taser or stun gun in Nevada.

Where Can You Carry a Taser in Nevada?

You can carry a taser or stun gun pretty much everywhere in Nevada with very few regulations, and remember that they aren’t restricted in the same way that firearms are.

However, you still cannot carry your taser or stun gun into a school of any kind or onto school property, or into any government building, office or installation including courtrooms, police stations, polling places on voting day, and any government meeting whether or not is open to the public.

And don’t forget, no tasers beyond the security checkpoint in airports, either!

When Can You Use a Taser to Defend Yourself in Nevada?

Just because it tasers are not classified as weapons, properly, in Nevada, that doesn’t mean you can use them irresponsibly! The only time you should ever use a taser in Nevada is if you’re afraid for your life or in fear of injury, or on behalf of the defense of someone else under the same threat.

That’s because tasers can (and have!)inflict great bodily injury or death on people. It happens in police use more often than you might think.

Accordingly, if you use your taser for any unlawful or unreasonable purpose, or zap someone as a joke, you’ll be subjected to severe criminal charges under NRS 200.481 covering battery.

NRS 200.481 – Battery: Definitions; penalties.

(e) If the battery is committed with the use of a deadly weapon, and:

(1) No substantial bodily harm to the victim results, for a category B felony by imprisonment in the state prison for a minimum term of not less than 2 years and a maximum term of not more than 10 years, and may be further punished by a fine of not more than $10,000.

(2) Substantial bodily harm to the victim results or the battery is committed by strangulation, for a category B felony by imprisonment in the state prison for a minimum term of not less than 2 years and a maximum term of not more than 15 years, and may be further punished by a fine of not more than $10,000.